April 23, 2014
paintgod:

my brief was to “Ask someone for instructions in what to do and then obey them” and i think i did pretty well! i asked my friend “what should i do for this assignment?” and she said the above quote and then i had to make a record of it!!

paintgod:

my brief was to “Ask someone for instructions in what to do and then obey them” and i think i did pretty well! i asked my friend “what should i do for this assignment?” and she said the above quote and then i had to make a record of it!!

(via okayjokesover)

April 23, 2014
"Poetry is not an expression of the party line. It’s that time of night, lying in bed, thinking what you really think, making the private world public, that’s what the poet does"

— Allen Ginsberg (via fouramcoffee)

(via ringtales)

April 23, 2014
"You’re a poet. Welcome to hell."

— James Wright to his son Franz, after his son wrote his first poem and sent it to him.  (via seearrem)

(via ringtales)

April 23, 2014
"

“You cannot work too hard at poetry. People are bad at it not because they have tin ears, but because they simply don’t have the faintest idea how much work goes into it. It’s not as if you’re ordering a pizza or doing something that requires direct communication in a very banal way. But it seems these days the only people who spend time over things are retired people and prisoners. We bolt things, untasted.

It’s so easy to say, ‘That’ll do.’ Everyone’s in a hurry. People are intellectually lazy, morally lazy, ethically lazy…All the time. When people get angry with a traffic warden they don’t stop and think what it would be like to be a traffic warden or how annoying it would be if people could park wherever they liked. People talk lazily about how hypocritical politicians are. But everyone is. On the one hand we hate that petrol is expensive and on the other we go on about global warming. We abrogate the responsibility for thought and moral decisions onto others and then have the luxury of saying it’s not good enough.

At its best poetry engages with the realities of existence. That’s why it’s so grown up. It’s the absolute opposite of this Disney idea that if you dream hard enough you can get anything - that’s so manifestly not true. Good art has a skull showing. We just need to knuckle down and produce it.

I don’t like this idea that mankind is meant to feel wicked for existing. And that’s what religious people often make one feel. They think we should spend our time either apologising to God for being what we are, or praising him for making us what we are. I mean, what kind of God would need to be praised all the time? If we meet a human being like that we rapidly find them an appalling bore. And if we have to apologise to the creator of the universe, too, that’s mad. Atheists also feel the need to apologise to nature: ‘Oh, I’m so sorry that I behave like a man. And that’s so unfair on poor squirrels and mice and things.’ Bollocks, you know. Tree frogs don’t get up in the morning and say, ‘Oh dear, I should have been a better tree frog.’ One has to be reasonable about it. And to recognise that we’ve done many good and remarkable things. We may have created a lot of landfill sites, but we’ve also produced King Lear and Don Giovanni and the Parthenon. Wonderful things, beautiful.”

"

— Stephen Fry (via ringtales)

April 23, 2014
"The Colombian novelist Alvaro Mutis used to tell a story about his close friend and compatriot Gabriel García Márquez, who has died aged 87. In the mid-Sixties, when the latter was writing One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967), they met every evening for a drink. García Márquez would tell Mutis about the scenes he’d written that day, and Mutis would listen, waiting avidly for the next installment. He started telling their friends that “Gabo” – as García Márquez was affectionately known – was writing a book in which a man called X did Y, and so on. When the novel was published, however, it bore no relation to the story García Márquez had told over tequila – not the characters or the plot or any aspect at all. Mutis was left with the feeling of having been brilliantly duped, and he mourned the unwritten novel of the bar, that ephemeral fiction no one else would ever hear."

— (via jacobwren)

(via ringtales)

April 22, 2014

pokemean:

youngharlemshawty:

World Population : 7,810,521,683 

just in case somebody start feelin too important

7,810,521,682 and me

image

(via theworldneedsmorespinach)

April 22, 2014
flavorpill:

She treats writing like a regular 9 to 5 job (including the built-in time-wasting).

A 9 to 5 job in which I actually work about 6 hours and wander around the house thinking about working the other two. My goals are never to hit a word count — I’ve tried that before and for me it leads to sloppy, panicked writing. I try to think in terms of scenes: Where am I in the book and what scene would I like to get done today? I never wait for the inspiration to strike. That would be a long, sad wait.Successful writing is one part inspiration and two parts sheer stubbornness.

15 Things We Learned From Gillian Flynn’s Reddit AMA

flavorpill:

She treats writing like a regular 9 to 5 job (including the built-in time-wasting).

A 9 to 5 job in which I actually work about 6 hours and wander around the house thinking about working the other two. My goals are never to hit a word count — I’ve tried that before and for me it leads to sloppy, panicked writing. I try to think in terms of scenes: Where am I in the book and what scene would I like to get done today? I never wait for the inspiration to strike. That would be a long, sad wait.Successful writing is one part inspiration and two parts sheer stubbornness.

15 Things We Learned From Gillian Flynn’s Reddit AMA

(via thetaoofdana)

April 22, 2014
"

Love comes with a knife,
not some shy question,
and not with fears for its reputation.

I say these things disinterestedly.
Accept them in kind.

Love is a madman,
working his wild schemes,
tearing off his clothes,
drinking poison, and now quietly
choosing annihilation.

A tiny spider tries to wrap
an enormous wasp. Think of the spiderweb
woven across the cave where Muhammed slept.

There are love stories,
and there is obliteration into love.

You have been walking the ocean’s edge,
holding up your robes to keep them dry.

You must dive deeper under,
a thousand times deeper.

Love flows down. The ground
submits to the sky and suffers what comes.

Is the ground worse for giving like that?
Do not put blankets over the drum.
Open completely.

Let your spirit ear listen
to the green dome’s passionate murmur.

Let the cords of your robe be untied.
Shiver in this new love
beyond all above and below.

The sun rises,
but which way does the night go?

I have no more words.
Let the soul speak
with the silent articulation of a face.

"

-Rumi, “Beyond Love Stories”
(via semperaugustus)

(via ringtales)

April 22, 2014
"Don’t be afraid to fall in love. It’s the only thing that matters in life. The only thing, do you understand what I’m telling you? You fall in love with as many things as possible."

— Kelly Canter (Gwyneth Paltrow); Country Strong (2010)

(Source: vanillya, via ringtales)

April 22, 2014
"No matter what, nobody can take away the dances you’ve already had."

— Gabriel García Márquez (via thoughtsforbees)

(Source: policymic, via ringtales)