September 14, 2014
mimswriter:

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction
1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.
2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.
3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.
4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.
5. Start as close to the end as possible.
6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.
7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.
8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.
9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.
10. Do not ramble.
11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.
12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.
13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.
14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.
15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.
16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

mimswriter:

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction

1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.

10. Do not ramble.

11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.

12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.

13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.

14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.

15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.

16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

(via notational)

September 14, 2014
"a group of people is called a hell"

Friedrice Nietzsche on Twitter (via nevver)

shouldn’t that be @sartre?

(via nevver)

September 13, 2014
leepyr:

doitforasgard:

samcannon:

“You can’t control the Universe. You are the water, not the rock.” 

But actually, after a very long time, if it keeps going, the water will eventually shape the rock. You don’t realize it at first but it’s happening, it happens every second. Yes, you’re the water, but if you can’t see how you changed the universe, it doesn’t mean you didn’t.

You are what everyone needs in their life

leepyr:

doitforasgard:

samcannon:

“You can’t control the Universe. You are the water, not the rock.” 

But actually, after a very long time, if it keeps going, the water will eventually shape the rock. You don’t realize it at first but it’s happening, it happens every second. Yes, you’re the water, but if you can’t see how you changed the universe, it doesn’t mean you didn’t.

You are what everyone needs in their life

(via wralthe)

September 13, 2014
"I just want to sleep with someone new
Someone I’ve never met
Knowing it’s a foolish thing to do
And sure to cause regret
There is no reason to do our love wrong
When we’re together it’s sweet and strong
It’s where I belong

But I just want to sleep with someone new
Who doesn’t know my name
Who comes and takes my hand out of the blue
Just like in a dream
Pass any doorway, ride any train
Walk into any room - beauty stakes its claim
And drives it home again and again and again

I just want to sleep with someone else
Touch some different skin
To do or not to do is both ways false
But one’s a greater sin
I’m not about to tear this house down
And I couldn’t stand to sneak around
And lose this love I’ve found
So daily, I will make her someone new"

— Paul Kelly (via dullifelingerie)

September 13, 2014
"Once, Picasso was asked what his paintings meant. He said, ‘Do you ever know what the birds are singing? You don’t. But you listen to them anyway.’ So, sometimes with art, it is important just to look."

— Marina Abramović  (via observando)

(via wralthe)

September 13, 2014
austinkleon:

“Followed my bliss” cartoon by Pat Byrnes

Filed under: do what you love

austinkleon:

“Followed my bliss” cartoon by Pat Byrnes

Filed under: do what you love

September 12, 2014

The romantic soulmate is only one aspect of this notion. 
     Never forget that. 

The romantic soulmate is only one aspect of this notion. 

     Never forget that. 

(Source: toothpastelove, via bridgettelizabeth)

September 12, 2014
On the hunger

dearcoquette:

Have you ever lost the hunger? You seem like someone who consumes everything and delights in it all. But have you ever lost it, for even a period of time? If so, how did you get it back? Is the hunger of discovery and experience something that can be taught or practiced without being born with it?


I lose the hunger all the time. Right now, for instance. August left my body sore and my soul polluted. I’m spiritually exhausted, and the strength it takes to recover borrows from the hunger.

It’s not all that unpleasant. It’s not much of anything really, a sort of constant state of anhedonia. Nothing tastes. Nothing touches. Words come out of me, but I don’t recognize them. I’m just here, making a bunch of gestures and signs, interacting with a world I can’t feel.

It’s okay, though. I’ve done this many times. I’m comfortable with the ebb and flow of my emotional well-being. It’s a delicate sine wave, the amplitude and frequency of which I’ve learned to observe from a distance without needing to control it in the moment.

I have enough perspective to recognize the balance. I know better than to course correct with chemicals or consumerism. I don’t wanna fuck up my curve, because I know the hunger comes back.

It’s not up to me, but it always comes back. The trick is in giving up that control, in fully accepting that it’s not up to me, in knowing that nothing is or ever was up to me in the first place, and that it’s all gonna be okay, even if it’s not.

I’ll let you know when I’m hungry again.

September 12, 2014
'Take what you want and pay for it, says God.'

actegratuit:

"There’s a Spanish proverb,that’s always fascinated me. ‘Take what you want and pay for it, says God.’I don’t believe in God,but that principle seems, to me, to have a divinity of its own; a kind of blazing purity. What could possibly be simpler, or more crucial? You can have anything you want, as long as you accept that there is a price and that you will have to pay it.It seems to me,that we as a society have come to overlook the second clause. We hear only ‘Take what you want, says God’; nobody mentions a price, and when it comes time to settle the score, everyone’s outraged. Take the national economic explosion, as the most obvious example: that’s come at a price, and a very steep one, to my mind. We have sushi bars and SUVs, but people our age can’t afford homes in the city where they grew up, so centuries-old communities are disintegrating like sand castles. People spend five or six hours a day in traffic; parents never see their children, because they both have to work overtime to make ends meet. We no longer have time for culture—theaters are closing, architecture is being wrecked to make way for office blocks. And so on and so forth. We’ve taken what we wanted and we’re paying for it, and no doubt many people feel that on balance the deal is a good one. What I do find surprising is the frantic silence that surrounds this price. The politicians tell us, constantly, that we live in Utopia. If anyone with any visibility ever suggests that this bliss may not come free, then that dreadful little man—what’s his name? the prime minister—comes on the television, not to point out that this toll is the law of nature, but to deny furiously that it exists and to scold us like children for mentioning it. I finally had to get rid of the television,we’ve become a nation of defaulters: we buy on credit, and when the bill comes in, we’re so deeply outraged that we refuse even to look at it.”

The Likeness, Tana French

September 12, 2014

(Source: airows, via whineo)