October 21, 2014

greatleapsideways:

A brief but typically illuminating conversation between Hans Ulrich Obrist and John Berger, followed by a reading from his wonderful essay in response to the London Looting of the summer of 2011, The Time We Live, from the “Memory Marathon" of 2012 at The Serpentine, London.

(via artspotting)

October 21, 2014
explore-blog:

If you read one thing today, make it Ursula K. Le Guin (b. October 21, 1929) on what beauty really means and how we limit the full range of our experience. 

explore-blog:

If you read one thing today, make it Ursula K. Le Guin (b. October 21, 1929) on what beauty really means and how we limit the full range of our experience

October 21, 2014
"Glamour cannot exist without personal social envy being a common and widespread emotion. The industrial society which has moved towards democracy and then stopped half way is the ideal society for generating such an emotion. The pursuit of individual happiness has been acknowledged as a universal right. Yet the existing social conditions make the individual feel powerless. He lives in the contradiction between what he is and what he would like to be."

— John Berger quoted in Instagram and Art Theory. Go read!

October 21, 2014
12 Essential Essays for Writers

tetw:

image

On Keeping a Notebook by Joan Didion - A great essay about making notes that gets to the very core of the writing process

Write Like a Motherfucker by Cheryl Strayed - Raw, emotional advice on the role of humility and surrender in the often tortured world of the writer

Thoughts on Writing by Elizabeth Gilbert  - On disicpline, hard work, rejection and why it’s never too late to start

Write Till You Drop by Annie Dillard - “Do you think I could be a writer?” “I don’t know… . Do you like sentences?”

Everything you Need to Know About Writing Successfully - in Ten Minutes by Stephen King - Short, sharp advice on everything from talent and self-criticism to having fun and entertaining your audience

Why I Write by George Orwell - On egoism, a love of beauty, the quest for truth and the desire to change the world — Orwell’s ‘four great motive for writing’.

Despite Tough Guys, Life Is Not the Only School for Real Novelists by Kurt Vonnegut - A beautifully argued defence of the role of teaching in developing writers.

That Crafty Feeling by Zadie Smith - A lecture by a great essayist and novelist on the craft of writing.

A Place You All Know Well by Michael Chabon - On the central role of exporation in writing.

The Nature of Fun by David Foster Wallace (excerpt) - DFW on what drives writers to write

Uncanny the Singing That Comes from Certain Husks by Joy Williams - “Who cares if the writer is not whole? Of course the writer is not whole, or even particularly well…”

Where Do You Get Your Ideas? by Neil Gaiman - A meditation on inspriation

Those Words That Echo…Echo…Echo Through Life by Jamaica Kincaid - Another great essay from the the New York Times Writers on Writing series

October 21, 2014
"Thomas H. Huxley is supposed to have exclaimed after reading On the Origin of Species, “How stupid of me not to have thought of this.” But why didn’t he think of it? The history of human thought would make it seem that there is difficulty in thinking of an idea even when all the facts are on the table. Making the cross-connection requires a certain daring. It must, for any cross-connection that does not require daring is performed at once by many and develops not as a “new idea,” but as a mere “corollary of an old idea.” It is only afterward that a new idea seems reasonable. To begin with, it usually seems unreasonable. It seems the height of unreason to suppose the earth was round instead of flat, or that it moved instead of the sun, or that objects required a force to stop them when in motion, instead of a force to keep them moving, and so on."

Published for the First Time: a 1959 Essay by Isaac Asimov on Creativity | MIT Technology Review (via wildcat2030)

(via wildcat2030)

October 21, 2014
"A person willing to fly in the face of reason, authority, and common sense must be a person of considerable self-assurance. Since he occurs only rarely, he must seem eccentric (in at least that respect) to the rest of us. A person eccentric in one respect is often eccentric in others."

Published for the First Time: a 1959 Essay by Isaac Asimov on Creativity | MIT Technology Review (via wildcat2030)

(via wildcat2030)

October 20, 2014
austinkleon:


Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s four types of readers
From lecture two of his Seven Lectures On Shakespeare and Milton
(Thx @communicatrix!)

austinkleon:

Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s four types of readers

From lecture two of his Seven Lectures On Shakespeare and Milton

(Thx @communicatrix!)

(via notational)

October 20, 2014
"

MOVIE STAR: BRING ME MY PAIN TWIN

DIRECTOR: do you mean your stunt double

MOVIE STAR: BRING ME MY AGONY SHADOW WHO SUFFERS FOR ME

"

A Movie Star Names Things" - Mallory Ortberg

I actually literally can’t with this.

(via knottahooker)

(Source: tyrannosaurus-trainwreck, via ronenreblogs)

October 20, 2014
"

So when people leave, I’ve learned the secret: let them. Because, most of the time, they have to.

Let them walk away and go places. Let them have adventures in the wild without you. Let them travel the world and explore life beyond a horizon that you exist in. And know, deep down, that heroes aren’t qualified by their capacity to stay but by their decision to return.

"

— The Staying Philosophy (Everyday Isa)

(Source: everydayisa.wordpress.com, via onherway)

October 20, 2014
"We don’t have to take things so personally. We take things to heart that we have no business taking to heart. For instance, saying “If you loved me you wouldn’t drink” to an alcoholic makes as much sense as saying “If you loved me, you wouldn’t cough” to someone who has pneumonia. Pneumonia victims will cough until they get appropriate treatment for their illness. Alcoholics will drink until they get the same. When people with a compulsive disorder do whatever it is they are compelled to do, they are not saying they don’t love you—they are saying they don’t love themselves."

— Melody Beattie (via onherway)